Project 15

The Basics of the Contest

The Means of Entry: Send the full URL of your blog post to ngilmour@ec.edu

The Deadline: All entries must be in Nathan Gilmour’s inbox by midnight at the end of each month.

The Prizes: Each month the CCAC will select the month’s best post and award the writer a $50 gift card. The winner will be announced in the daily announcements email, and Nathan Gilmour will contact the winner to arrange delivery of the gift card prize.  If Gilmour can get the gift credit online or in the Athens area, it’s fair game for this contest.

In addition, the best entries each month will be featured on the main page of the Composition Culture website, increasing Google exposure and allowing the EC community and anyone else who finds us an opportunity to read your work.

The Content: The sky is the limit–just think of a way that you could be a blessing to the 15 people who stumble upon your blog post.  Have you read a book (for class or otherwise) that has helped you think more clearly about the intersection of Christian faith and academic learning?  Do you have a story that illustrates the power of God’s love?  Do you see patterns in the ways that we Christians live our lives that deserve some theological reflection?  Does a recent movie do something interesting with the realities that we Christians sing and preach about, and can you make that connection between pop culture and Jesus-shaped spirituality clear for readers on the Internet?  You get the picture.  In past iterations of this contest, the entries that have done well have been as various as these:

So look to the links on the right, start a blog, and show the Internet what Knowledge Inspired looks like!

The Idea Behind Project 15

In 1968, Andy Warhol, observing what television and pop music radio were doing to American culture, made his famous prediction that “In the future everybody will be world famous for fifteen minutes.”

Twenty-three years later, August Momus, writing for an underground magazine,  theorized that centralized distribution, not inherent genius, made people like Lucille Ball, Elvis Presley, and the Beatles the gigantic television and radio phenomena that they became.  In a world with far more distribution channels, Momus predicted,”In the future everybody will be famous for fifteen people…

Now, twenty years later still, Momus’s future stands to be a blessing for the 15 people who find your site.  In addition to providing links to your site from this one, Project 15 hopes to promote good, smart, online writing by educated Christians with monthly contests, conversations with other bloggers, and whatever other encouragement we can offer.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s